Be careful of what you have in your front pockets if you sit when you play your guitar. When you rest the side if your guitar on your lap, it sits right on top of your right front pocket if you play right handed or left front pocket if you play left handed. Something hard like car keys or change in your pocket can damage, possibly crack the side of your guitar because of the pressure of your arm resting on the other side of the guitar. Either empty your respective front pocket or before you sit, reach in and push the pocket to the outside of your leg so it doesn't touch the guitar.

Also be careful of your belt buckle, especially if you stand and play your guitar. It will scratch the back of your guitar very badly.

Gman ( o )==#

 

I was going to suggest that you add to your Belt Buckles and Pockets tip .. SUSPENDERS !! I always knew to watch out for Belt Buckles ..but, I took to wearing suspenders on the stage for a while and did a really ugly number on the back of my Taylor guitar. The snap that you attach to your waist band will do more damage than any belt buckle could. Trust me on this one.

Thanks for the great guitar site.

Mark Harvey

 

Regarding the tip about belt buckles scratching the back of the instrument, I've found that a mechanic's belt is a good solution. A mechanic's belt has a leather-covered buckle, and the tail end of the belt ends up on the inside instead of the outside of the belt. Looks neat and won't scratch. Also covers up the button on jeans, which is an occasional scratch culprit.

Noah Balmer

 

I play a Taylor regularly in a Folk Choir in Church and like most people, I wear a belt with a metal buckle to hold up my pants.  When I have a sweater or coat covering the buckle that's fine, but when it's just the bear buckle against the back of the guitar, it's for sure not a good combination.  What I do is, I will place a handkerchief 3 - 4 layers thick wrapped around my belt & buckle.  It stays in place without me thinking about it at all.  Now I just keep a dark colored handkerchief in my case, and pull it out when I need it.

Mark Huang,
From Hong Kong

HOME                         BACK TO CARE & PRESERVATION TIPS